Global Skills – for what?

Which skills are needed for living and working in a global economy? Since some years, the discussion on skills and competences penetrates education (see, for example, European Commissions reference framework “Key competences for livelong learning” or the most recently renewed “European agenda for adult learning”) – and with globalisation came “global skills”.

However, the skills agenda, including the discussion on „global skills“ seems to be highly dominated by economic, and in particular neo-liberal thinking based on notions such as growth, competition and employability. From this viewpoint, education is regarded mainly as (collective or individual) investment, which is “lost” without any measurable return on investment, such as employment with highest possible pay. So states a UNESCO/British Council seminar report on “Skills for Work, Growth and Poverty Reduction” (sic!) already in the second paragraph of the foreword that “if young people cannot acquire the skills they need for the labour market when they finish school, the investment in primary education may be wasted”. To my opinion, this is a very dangerous view: It reduces education and the acquisition of skills to the requirements of the market (no matter if the learner actually wants to be part of this market) and leaves alone the aspect of personal (and collective) development as purpose of education. The school education of people outside the formal labour market (such as housewives, open source IT developers, volunteers etc) would be useless according to this view, as they are not seeking market based pay for their work.

Furthermore, it seems that the global skills agenda is “hijacked” by actors who’s main motivation is certainly not the transformation of the current exploitative system, but profit and economic competitiveness. So expects the German Employers Association its employees to have “integrated thinking and knowledge about world economics and ecology, as well as [..] a stable set of values, feel empathy and be interculturally competent.”. PriceWaterhouseCoopers claims that people should “be socially aware, possess intercultural communication skills, be thoughtful, committed to accountability and above all compassionate” (quoted by Doug Bourn in a report on “Global Skills”).

What Global Skills are these, that are so appreciated by German employers and a multinational company that has as one of three main activities “tax advisory” (a nice euphemism for tax evasion)? Can you feel empathy, be socially aware, compassionate etc while doing big business as usual?

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