Getting it right – towards a rights based approach to education

Children are citizens, with specific characteristics and a potential to contribute to the collective like any other social group. This is not the credo of an obscure child-power movement, but international law of the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), which has been ratified by all UN member states but USA and Somalia. I learned this in my Development Education Master at the IOE/University of London, where I’m following Hugh Starkey’s module on citizenship, children’s rights and identities in this autumn term (see short youtube clip above).

If applied consequently, the effects of the Child Rights Convention on education would be massive: Schooling would need to put the child’s rights at the very centre of learning, and not presumed needs, which are often the needs of the institution or the economy. The essay below examines how the right to education, rights in education and rights through education can be applied in schools. The article concludes:

A qualitative shift towards a truly human rights based education has to be based on a broad public debate. This would include a shift in the collective mindset of seeing schools mainly as training camps for labour markets and social requirements towards a concept of social orchards stimulating the flourishing of varieties of humans which all play crucial roles in the social system. Schools can stimulate this process, but all of us have to embrace it in order to become meaningful.

Enjoy the reading!

Getting it right: Towards a rights based approach to education, based on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child

When NGDOs say “engaging with the public”, they mean getting their money through marketing & advertisement?

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UK civil society recently engaged in remarkable reflections on roles of NGOs in a changing environment (e.g. the Smart CSOs initiative), and particularly on the question of how to engage with the public on issues which go beyond the people’s immediate self-interest. The Common Cause process led to a number of excellent, yet challenging reports, of which “Finding Frames – new ways to engage the UK public in global poverty” is particularly interesting for the development sector (and thus for questions related to global learning).

When I learned that a team of researchers from Polis, the journalism think tank at the LSE, started a reflection on “the relationship between audiences’ knowledge and caring and action” in cooperation with a number of big NGOs such as Plan UK, Oxfam and Save the Children, I was eager to read the first report of this three years research project.

Unfortunately, the findings are disappointing. Based on a round table discussion with high level communication, campaign and advocacy people (no development education people where present – sic!), the reports findings are framed in a logic of marketing, growth and competition. It does not touch on a number of key questions:

  • How can NGOs actually get out of a logic of competion and organisational self-interest in order to serve a common cause towards a systemic transformation of society – together with the UK citizens?
  • How can NGOs overcome the illusion that development aid will actually lead to development, and engage in a honest debate with a ever critical public about this?
  • How can the public actually engage and act – also and especially through NGOs – instead of only giving money or signing petitions?

The paper refers repeatedly to the Finding Frames report, which asks these difficult questions, but the reflection remains strongly in the frames of aid (“getting money to people on the ground” – what about political work in UK and partner countries?), needs and service delivery (what about a human rights based approach to development?) and, when it comes to the UK audience, getting their money through sophisticated marketing and advertisement strategies. It seems that empowerment is a nice buzz word for the “field work” but does not apply to the engagement with the UK citizens. A reflection on how the citizens (here and there!) can be integrated in a meaningful role in the work of the NGOs (including the strategic reflections and decision making processes) is completely missing.

Nevertheless, it is interesting reading, which shows that there’s still a lot of work to do within civil society organisations in order to overcome aid based, salvationist thinking, and to have a real debate on the transformative role (and duty!) of NGOs to work together with citizens to change things here and there.

You can download the report here:

Who Cares? Challenges and Opportunities in Communicating Distant Suffering.

Can the People write the next Global Development Goals?

How to crowd source the sustainable development goals (or whatever post-MDG beyond 2015 development goals will look like) – asks Joe Mitchell in his highly interesting blog on “Global Governance 2.0″.

How can citizens all over the world participate in a meaningful way in global governance processes? Wouldn’t board grassroots participation in the writing of the next MDGs the ultimate demonstration of active global citizenship? How can global learning contribute to facilitate citizen participation in governance processes? How can “Global Civil Society” become more than an anaemic and institutional network of INGOs? Which tools (such as LiquidFeedback – intensively used by the German Pirate Party for grassroots participatory decision making) can be set up to organise such a huge and complex undertaking like crowd sourcing global goals? And, if crowd sourcing is a way to go, how to overcome the digital divide?

 

PS: These are busy times, and I’m sorry not having kept the enthusiastic publication rhythm on this blog. But there are some interesting ideas in the pipeline, including a critical reflection on the EP campaign, a post-colonial critique of the UN Decade on Education for Sustainable Development and sone thoughts on our representation of the world. I’ll keep you posted – and thanks to all visitors, commentators and followers!

Tobias